Tuesday, September 04, 2007

Plays

Watched a play at Rangasankara with colleagues. The proceeds they said, would go to an NGO for children, Dream a Dream. It was like a school annual day function and we really enjoyed it. The play was based on a story from the Panchatantra. Many kids in the audience were so involved with the play and were screaming out ‘yes’ and ‘nos’ and replying to queries when the cast posed them questions. We laughed all the way seeing them answer. Theatre is really doing well in Bangalore. Best part about Rangasankara is that the tickets are moderately priced and the play starts dot on time. Nobody is allowed to enter after the play starts.

Talking about kids and plays, my colleague shared her experience as a parent when her child participated for a play in his school. It seems he had to be a Banyan tree. All he had to do was stand behind the prop and put his face out of the tree. She bought cardboards, drew, made cut outs, painted, hung jute ropes for the roots and finally, it was ready. After all that effort, the Banyan tree stood in one corner of the stage with her son’s face popping out quietly. Even after the play, she did not have the heart to do away with the Banyan tree and retained it in her house for a very long time.

Moral of the story: Do not ignore the vegetables and the trees in children’s plays. They are the hard work of the parents.

12 comments:

AmitL said...

Hi,Arunima,I also luv going to watch plays-no comparison with movies at all.:)As for children's plays,haven't seen one since quite some time,but,can imagine the tiny tots' excitement.And,nice moral of the story.

vekspace said...

At times I wonder if it is the vanities of parents and teachers that you notice as banyan trees and vegetables in childrens plays.

Poor kids!!!!

manuscrypts said...

haha, true, i remember playing an ashwamedha horse in primary school :)

Arunima said...

@vekspace: i don't think it is the vanity of the parents or the teachers. I think for the parents, it is about getting involved in their child's life and seeing their child happy.

Stone said...

:-)

AmitL said...

I quite agree with you,Arunima..the banyan trees,vegetables,etc,depict the hard work the parents who want to get involved in their child's life put in to ensure that their kid looks among the best,in the play...and,they all look so cute.:)I feel sorry for the kids who have to depend on their ayah's for such events.

Adorable Pancreas said...

I know what you mean. My mom still has the red indian costume I wore in some play when I was 4.

Tys on Ice said...

i was the tree in one of our school plays...well, my mom decided to keep me...so i figure u r rite...

Well Heeled said...

:)

AmitL said...

Next post,pls.:)

Layon said...

Knowing that I was a visitor to this place a lady friend of mine insisted that we should watch this play...went to buy tickets and saw only two categories of audience... kids and their parents ( I was none of them)...somehow convinced my friend that the tickets were sold out ;)

Samba said...

Rangashankara is a brilliant place. As you said the play starts doton time. The tragedy is the cutof time to buy tickets is 1 hour before the play starts!